The regions of Italy

The main regions of Italy (think of them like U.S. states)

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Toscana is the heart of Italy, home to the art of Florence, the wines of the Chianti, the Leaning Tower of Pisa, and countless medieval hilltowns

 
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From the famous canals of Venice to the shores of Lake Garda to the sights of Verona, art of Padova, architecture of Vicenza, villas of the Brenta, and hilltowns of Asolo and Bassano del Grappa

 
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A travel guide to help you plan the perfect trip to Italy's Campania region: From Naples to the Amalfi Coast, Capri to Pompeii, these are the glories of Southern Italy's Campania region

 
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A land of saints and frescoes, mountains and chocolates, hill towns and medieval cities

 
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The Mediterranean's largest island is a world until itself of Greek temples, active volcanoes, trendy resorts, crumbling baroque cities, and unexplored hinterlands

 
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The heel of Italy's boot is a fairy-tale land of pointy trulli houses, octagonal castles, whitewashed fishing towns, and baroque cities

 
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From mighty Milan to the shores of Lake Como backed by the cut-glass peaks of the Alps, Lombardia is Italy's wealthiest region

 
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Piemonte, or Piedmont, lies in the very northwestern corner of Italy, tucked between France and (just north of the tiny autonomous region of Valle d'Aosta) Switzerland

 
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Lazio is dominated by the city of Rome—but it also has its share of hilltowns, wineries, lakes, mountains, and ancient ruins that lie outside the Eternal City

 
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The Italian Riviera includes chic resort town, hikes in the Cinque Terre fishing villages, and the gritty Renaissance port city of Genova

 
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This culinary wonderland north of the Apennine Mountains is home to the university city of Bologna, Byzantine mosaics of Ravenna, Renaissance art of Ferrara, and prosciutto purveyors of Parma

 
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Northern Italy's mountainous Trentino Alto-Adige is a region of Alps and Dolomites, of lakes and Alpine planes, and of frescoed castles and Teutonic villages where the local food (and dialect) is German, not Italian

 
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The plains meet the Alps head-on in the Valle d’Aosta, with its craggy mountains, rugged mountain folk, and year-round skiing at resorts such as Courmayeur and Entrèves in the shadow of Mont Blanc.

 
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The Mediterranean's second largest island boats ancient ruins, glittering beaches, gorgeous hikes, and an ancient culture so apart from Italy it even has its own distinct languages

 
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This forgotten northeast corner of Italy marks the border with Slovenia, a region of tame Alps, rolling hills, and Adriatic beaches. Its culture lies at the crossroads of Italy, Yugoslavia, and Austria—the Adriatic port city of Trieste was once the main port for Vienna and the Hapsburgs, and has the coffeehouses to prove it.

 
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Seaside resort cities and mountainous Renaissance capitals

 
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The mountainous heart of Italy

 
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Southern Italy's Basilicata is home to cities carved from caves

 
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Greek ruins, national parks, and fishing villages sprinkle the long "toe" of Italy's boot

 
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Italy's second smallest region spots lovely hikes, ancient ruins, and a laid-back village life long lost in busier parts of Italy

 
 
 
 

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